Stakeholder Advisory Council

The Stakeholder Advisory Council (SAC) was established by the RHRA Board of Directors in February 2012. The Council is not a committee of the Board.  The purpose of the Council is to provide advice on matters relating to the RHRA’s mandate. Members are appointed by the board for their relevant knowledge and experience in the retirement homes sectors as residents, owners/operators, regulated health professionals, associates in advocacy organizations, etc. Members are appointed for one or two-year terms and may be re-appointed. Members of the Stakeholder Advisory Council provide a report, at least annually, to the RHRA board on the SAC’s activities and advice and is included in the RHRA’s Annual Report.

Graham Webb, Chair, of Toronto, is the Executive Director of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE), and has been a Staff Litigation Lawyer at the organization since 1995. ACE is a community legal service for low income seniors that focuses on legal issues that have a greater impact on the older population. Before joining ACE, Graham was engaged in private practice for ten years in Barrie, Ontario, in a general practice with emphasis on civil and criminal litigation. Graham gives frequent legal education presentations on elder law issues to older adults and service providers, including police, health-care professionals and other lawyers. Graham has also served as a part-time evening instructor in Gerontology at Ryerson University, winning an award from the Continuing Education Students’ Association at Ryerson for excellence in teaching.

Andria Bianchi, of Toronto, is a Bioethicist and Clinician-Scientist at the University Health Network and affiliated with the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at University of Toronto as an Assistant Professor. She completed her PhD at the University of Waterloo where her research focused on ethical implications related to persons with dementia and sexual consent. She is currently involved in various funded research projects, all of which relate to the geriatric population. Andria is a bioethicist member of the Joint Centre of Bioethics, a board member of the Canadian Association of Practicing Healthcare Ethicists – Association Canadienne des Éthiciens en Soins de Santé (CAPHE-ACÉSS), and a board member of Advance Gerontological Education (AGE) Inc.

Gail Walker, of Toronto is the Director of Retirement at Belmont House. Prior to working at Belmont House, she was the Administrator of a Long Term Care Home with Chartwell Seniors Housing. Gail has also worked as a Program Manager at the Alzheimer’s Society of Peel, Manager of Programs and Health and Safety at the Ukrainian Canadian Care Centre and Professional Practice Leader at the Toronto Rehabilitation Centre. Gail is a member of the Ontario Retirement Communities Association (ORCA) and is an Executive member of Ontario Association of Non Profit Housing Services for Seniors (OANHSS) Region 5, serving as their Housing Representative. Gail also chairs a Retirement Home Networking group in Toronto.

Nira Rittenberg has extensive experience and expertise in geriatrics and dementia care. With more than 20 years of experience as a Senior Occupational Therapist at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, and in private practice, she has in-depth understanding of the broader health care system.  Nira has written several publications about dementia and is a lecturer at the University of Toronto Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.  She is also a columnist at the Toronto Star and writes for the “Caregiver SOS”, column.  Most recently, Nira, participated in the making of the CBC documentary “The Caregivers’ Club”, which tell the story of her clients living with dementia over the course of year.

Florene Shuber, of Toronto, is an active advocate and volunteer for older adults, including volunteering with people living with dementia. Florene graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School and practiced law in education, employment and family. She began her career with the Toronto District School Board and eventually entered leadership roles in Toronto Montessori Schools, Toronto Montessori Institute and the Canadian Council of Montessori Administrators. In 2005, Florene and her partners founded the Montessori Teachers College and in 2016, she helped create the Montessori Dementia Program. Florene also has Board experience serving as Co-Chair of Toronto Montessori Schools and Toronto Montessori Institute Board of Directors, as well as Chair of the Montessori Teachers College Board of Directors.

Rose Lamb, of Minesing, is the Senior Vice President of Operations (East Region) of Schlegel Villages. Rose supports 11 village teams where they continue to look for ways to serve seniors and strive to change the culture of aging. Prior to her current position, she served as the senior leader for Sunrise Senior Living of McLean, Virginia. Rose serves on the Board of the Seniors Wish Foundation and supports other charities including Hospice Simcoe and Habitat for Humanity. She takes great pride in mentoring and developing the front-line team members and identifies ways to promote leaders from within villages, allowing a social living environment where people continue to live with purpose. Rose knows this for sure as her mom and dad each live with dementia and purpose in both retirement and long-term care.

Carolyn Derbyshire, of Orangeville, is involved in the day-to-day care of her father who resides in a retirement home. She is a graduate of the University of Western Ontario. Carolyn is a retired Emergency Communicator with Peel Regional Police. During her 23-year career, Carolyn was a trainer and an Acting Supervisor and assisted in the development of the Emergency back-up centre for communications in Peel Region. An active volunteer most of her life, she was ­­­on the Board of Directors with Brampton Telecare Distress Line. While raising her two children,­ Carolyn was active in the school parent council and held the Chair position for three years.

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A retirement home

There are more than 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


Status of home

Search the Retirement Home Database for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

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Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

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I'm not sure how to get started

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

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Steps to getting a licence

Get started on the licensing process and find out what you will need to submit an application.


Guidelines

As of July 1, 2012, homes that meet the definition of “retirement home” in the Act must have a licence from the RHRA to operate.

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Process

To assist you with the application process, the RHRA has put together an Applicant Guide. The Guide introduces you to the forms, supporting documents and fees that must be submitted.

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Fees

Review the 2018 Fee Schedule before submitting your application.

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Complaints & reporting harm

Reporting harm is a shared duty. Certain situations involving harm or risk of harm to any resident must be reported immediately by law. Here’s how to report harm or potential harm.


How to File a Report

Find out what constitutes harm and what you need to do if you see or suspect harm.

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RHRA Process

Find out what happens after the report has been made.

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Mandatory Reporting

What must you report and why.

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More information about RHRA

Understand our role, what we stand for and how we enforce ‘the Act’.


How we help

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Our Vision, Mission and Values

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Understanding the Legislature

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A retirement home

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Retirement Home Database for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Retirement Home Database for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Retirement Home Database for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Retirement Home Database for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More
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