Organizational Structure

Stakeholder Advisory Council

The Stakeholder Advisory Council (SAC) was established by the RHRA Board of Directors in February 2012. The Council is not a committee of the Board.  The purpose of the Council is to provide advice on matters relating to the RHRA’s mandate. Members are appointed by the board for their relevant knowledge and experience in the retirement homes sectors as residents, owners/operators, regulated health professionals, associates in advocacy organizations, etc. Members are appointed for one or two-year terms and may be re-appointed. Members of the Stakeholder Advisory Council provide a report, at least annually, to the RHRA board and the board comments on their activities and advice in the RHRA’s annual report.

Chair Esther Goldstein’s twelve years of work as a hospital social worker in the Greater Toronto Area led her to develop an interest in, and understanding of, the retirement home sector and to the work she currently does. In 1997, Esther created a resource directory on retirement homes that has evolved to become the “Comprehensive Guide to Retirement Living & Long-Term Care”. Esther now works full-time on the annual Guide and its affiliated website, www.senioropolis.com. Both the website and the book are relied upon resources by professionals who work with seniors, their families, as well as the retirement home industry across Ontario.

Father Greg Montreuil Blonde is an ordained a Catholic Priest and holds a Masters in Social Work from Carleton University. Greg is a retirement home resident and the elected Chair of his home’s Residents’ Council, having served in the role for the past three years. He is also interested in local history having recently published a book on the history of one of the last small one room schools in Ontario.

Beryl Collingwood, of Paris, Ontario began her career as a nurse, eventually moving into a number of key leadership roles within the retirement home and long-term care home sectors. Beryl is currently the VP of Operations for Lifetimes Living Inc., leading enhancement of both the resident and employee experience in 15 Ontario retirement homes. Beryl sits on the Education Committee and the Government Task Force at the Ontario Retirement Communities Association (ORCA) and is on the Board of Directors of Grand River Hospital and Brantford Community Healthcare System, where she sits on the Governance Committee and Quality and Patient Safety Committee.

Debbie Doherty, of Vaughan, is a registered nurse and has held several senior executive positions within the retirement home and long-term care sectors (both for profit and not-for-profit). Debbie has a consulting business that focuses on supporting Operators with Retirement Homes Act compliance and operational issues impacting on occupancy and client satisfaction. Debbie was instrumental in the development of the Ontario Retirement Communities Association (ORCA) standards and program while serving as the Chair of the ORCA Standards Committee (1997 2000). She then served as President of ORCA from 2000 to 2003. She rejoined as an ORCA board member in 2011 as VP Communications. Debbie is the former Chair of the Stakeholder Advisory Council.

Joyce Fearnside, of Toronto, is a retired nursing/retirement home administrator. A lifelong believer in the importance of community involvement, Joyce has engaged in community volunteer work for a variety of organizations, including the Hamilton Art Gallery, the Canadian Red Cross Society and the Christ Church Cathedral in Hamilton. In addition, Joyce has served on Board of Directors of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. Joyce is a retirement home resident and was elected Chair of her home’s Residents’ Council in 2014.

Paul Ouellette, of Cambridge, is President of Acronamic Learning Systems Inc. and Chief Operating Officer for Pixel Pros Inc., overseeing the production of education courses and online/print material for various Canadian organizations including real estate brokerages, associations and regulatory authorities. Over the past three decades, Paul has developed an extensive working knowledge of not-for-profit organizations, provincial/national associations and regulatory councils/commissions. Paul also served on the Board of Directors for a Community Care Access Centre.

Gail Walker, of Toronto is the Director of Retirement at Belmont House. Prior to working at Belmont House, She was the Administrator of a Long Term Care Home with Chartwell Seniors Housing. Gail has also worked as a Program Manager at the Alzheimer’s Society of Peel, Manager of Programs and Health and Safety at the Ukrainian Canadian Care Centre and Professional Practice Leader at the Toronto Rehabilitation Centre. Gail is a member of the Ontario Retirement Communities Association (ORCA) and is an Executive member of Ontario Association of Non Profit Housing Services for Seniors (OANHSS) Region 5, serving as their Housing Representative. Gail also chairs a Retirement Home Networking group in Toronto.

Graham Webb, of Toronto, is the Executive Director of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE), and has been a Staff Litigation Lawyer at the organization since 1995. ACE is a community legal service for low income seniors that focuses on legal issues that have a greater impact on the older population. Before joining ACE, Graham was engaged in private practice for ten years in Barrie, Ontario, in a general practice with emphasis on civil and criminal litigation. Graham gives frequent legal education presentations on elder law issues to older adults and service providers, including police, health-care professionals and other lawyers. Graham has also served as a part-time evening instructor in Gerontology at Ryerson University, winning an award from the Continuing Education Students’ Association at Ryerson for excellence in teaching.

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A retirement home

There are more than 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


Status of home

Search the Public Register for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

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Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

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I'm not sure how to get started

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

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Steps to getting a licence

Get started on the licensing process and find out what you will need to submit an application.


Guidelines

As of July 1, 2012, homes that meet the definition of “retirement home” in the Act must have a licence from the RHRA to operate.

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Process

To assist you with the application process, the RHRA has put together an Applicant Guide. The Guide introduces you to the forms, supporting documents and fees that must be submitted.

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Fees

Review the 2018 Fee Schedule before submitting your application.

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Complaints & reporting harm

Reporting harm is a shared duty. Certain situations involving harm or risk of harm to any resident must be reported immediately by law. Here’s how to report harm or potential harm.


How to File a Report

Find out what constitutes harm and what you need to do if you see or suspect harm.

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RHRA Process

Find out what happens after the report has been made.

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Mandatory Reporting

What must you report and why.

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More information about RHRA

Understand our role, what we stand for and how we enforce ‘the Act’.


How we help

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Our Vision, Mission and Values

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Understanding the Legislature

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A retirement home

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Public Register for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Public Register for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Public Register for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More

A retirement home 1

There are over 700 licensed retirement homes in Ontario. Let us help you find the one that’s right for you.


#ICON

Status of home

Search the Public Register for a complete history of a retirement home's compliance with the Act.

Read More
#ICON

Types of homes

If you've never lived in a retirement home or haven’t needed long-term care, you may not be aware of the difference between the two. Here is what you need to know.

Read More
#ICON

I’m not sure how to start

Here, we’ll provide tools to help support your research.

Read More
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